VISITING SAN REMO: HOW THIS ITALIAN CITY PLAYED A CRITICAL ROLE IN THE PROPHETIC REBIRTH OF ISRAEL

(San Remo, Italy) — For the first time in my life, I have had the opportunity to visit the Italian city of San Remo which played an historic role in the prophetic rebirth of the modern Jewish State of Israel.

In addition to being a beautiful seaside resort on the northern coast of the Mediterranean, home of some excellent restaurants and amazing cappuccinos to which I can now personally attest, San Remo is the site where ninety-two years ago — on April 25, 1920 — the leaders of the Principal Allied Powers who had just been victorious in World War I met for a critically important international conference. There, they divided the Ottoman Empire into several zones of control. The French would control what would later become the countries of Lebanon and Syria. The British would control what would later become the countries known as Israel, Jordan, and the nations of the Arabian peninsula. Indeed, it was at the San Remo Conference where Great Britain, France, Italy and Japan signed a formal treaty pledging to reestablish a Jewish state in the British Mandated territory then known as “Palestine.” The San Remo Conference thus provided the official basis in international law for the re-creation of the State of Israel in the 20th century that had been foretold by the Hebrew prophet Ezekiel in Ezekiel 36-37 more than 2,500 years earlier.

Two colleagues from The Joshua Fund and I visited the villa where the British Prime Minister Lloyd George and the others negotiated and signed the treaty, which the League of Nations endorsed, and was later signed by more than 50 other nations. Unfortunately, few people know of this important “chapter” of Israel’s modern story. I myself learned much more about it as I was preparing to speak at a conference on the history and future of Israel held at the European Union parliament, and as I was preparing for the 2011 Epicenter Conference. Tomas Sandell, the founder and director of the European Coalition for Israel and one of the speakers at our conference, helped me better understand the details regarding San Remo why they are so significant. Tomas is working hard to help European and other world leaders rediscover this history, and held a conference of his own in San Remo two years ago to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the resolution made there.

“At a time when even the core existence of Israel as a Jewish state is being challenged by its enemies it is of vital importance that we take a closer look at international law,” Sandell said at the time. He also noted that “the San Remo Resolution of 1920 recognized the national Jewish sovereignty on the land of Israel under international law, on the strength of the historical connection of the Jewish people to the territory previously known as Palestine.”

Given the international assault on Israel’s legal rights these days, I highly encourage you to do your own research on the history and importance of the San Remo conference and how the Lord used it to fulfill those ancient prophecies.

  • One good to place to start is this video report by CBN reporter Chris Mitchell.
  • Here is a key excerpt from the treaty signed in 1920: “The High Contracting Parties agree to entrust, by application of the provisions of Article 22, the administration of Palestine, within such boundaries as may be determined by the Principal Allied Powers, to a Mandatory, to be selected by the said Powers. The Mandatory will be responsible for putting into effect the declaration originally made on November 8, 1917, by the British Government, and adopted by the other Allied Powers, in favour of the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.”
  • The definitive book on the subject is The Legal Foundation and Borders of Israel Under International Law, by Professor Howard Grief.
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