Going from bad to worse: Russia creates alliance with Iran & Turkey. Turkey invades Syria. Trump abandons the Kurds. Evangelical leaders speak out. It’s a mess. Here’s the latest.

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(Denver, Colorado) — The Turkish offensive into northern Syria is a dangerous military development. The emerging Russian-Iranian-Turkish alliance is a dangerous geopolitical development. And President Trump’s willingness to so easily abandon America’s Kurdish allies is a dangerous diplomatic development that could have serious domestic political repercussions if Trump and his team are not more careful.

I’m glad that VP Pence and Secretary of State Pompeo are heading to the region to try to persuade Turkish President Erdogan to call off the offensive. And Trump is now threatening Turkey with sanctions and saying he will stand with the Kurds. But it’s far from certain this genie can be put back in its bottle. It may prove too little too late.

Recip Erdogan is not a serious, trustworthy ally. He’s a monster who wants to rebuild the Ottoman Empire. He us an Islamist who supports Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood terror movements. A few years ago, he arrested upwards of 200,000 Turks in a brazen crackdown on his political enemies. He’s allowed thousands of ISIS terrorists to criss-cross his territory unchecked. Now, his forces are killing Kurds, creating a new refugee crisis, and further destabilizing the disaster in Syria that was created by Bashar Assad, Vladimir Putin and the Iranians. I struggle to understand how Erdogan is still a member of NATO.

In his initial phone call with Erdogan before the invasion, President Trump should have made it crystal clear that he would not tolerate a Turkish attack on the Kurds. Unfortunately, Trump gave Erdogan every impression it wouldn’t be a problem, even ordering all US military forces in the area to leave.

A few days ago, I spoke with Amir Tibon, an Israeli reporter for Haaretz, who was stunned that various Evangelical leaders, myself included, were speaking out so strongly on the subject. I thought you might be interested in reading the full article, as well as excerpts.

TRUMP DIDN’T THINK HE COULD EVER LOSE THE EVANGELICAL VOTE — BUT THEN HE ABANDONED THE KURDS

For the first time since entering the White House, Donald Trump has encountered significant criticism from evangelical leaders. Does the president have reason to worry about his own ‘base’?

Excerpts:

  • Something unusual happened in American politics this week: President Donald Trump was criticized by leading figures in the evangelical community. One after another, prominent pastors and activists denounced his decision to remove U.S. troops from northeastern Syria and to stand aside as Turkey attacked Kurdish cities in the region. One pastor called the Turkish attack on the Kurds “a disgrace”; another warned Trump he could be “losing the mandate of heaven” over the decision.
  • It was the first time since Trump entered the White House in 2017 that he had to endure such a strong level of criticism from evangelical leaders. They had stood by him throughout the worst scandals of his presidency…..
  • In the 2016 election, white evangelicals cast approximately a quarter of all ballots in the presidential race, with 80 percent of them voting for Trump — which played a key role in his victory over Hillary Clinton.
  • Franklin Graham…tweeted on the subject…he directly addressed Trump and asked him to “reconsider” the decision….
  • Pat Robertson, an influential televangelist, warned on air that “the president of the United States is in danger of losing the mandate of heaven if he permits this to happen.” Both men are extremely loyal Trump supporters, who have so far rejected almost any kind of criticism aimed at the president and fiercely defended him….
  • Evangelical support for the Kurds is less well-known than the community’s support for Israel, and the two phenomena are very different from each other in terms of scope, history and levels of commitment. Support for Israel is a top priority for most evangelical voters and stems from religious beliefs about biblical prophecies. Support for the Kurds, meanwhile, is a relatively new phenomenon….
  • “Trump is still very popular in the evangelical community, and people remember all he’s done for Israel,” says Joel Rosenberg, an author and activist who has led several high profile evangelical delegations to Arab countries in recent years. Rosenberg tells Haaretz that “Trump is seen by most evangelicals as the most pro-Israel president ever, and as someone who has moved American policy in the Middle East in a good direction.”
  • But despite that strong level of support, Rosenberg cautions that Trump and his advisers should definitely be concerned by the reaction to the Syria decision. “It’s hard to make a case that this will have any political consequences for the president in the immediate future,” he says. “But it’s worth noting that this is the first time such criticism has been leveled at him from the evangelical community. I don’t think it would be wise to just ignore it.”….
  • According to Rosenberg, “It shouldn’t be a surprise that evangelicals care so much for the Kurdish people. The Kurds are loyal allies who fought bravely to defeat ISIS and have protected Christians in the region. They also have a history of working with Israel.” He says that evangelicals aren’t only pressuring Trump on this issue: Many were also highly critical of how the Obama administration, in his words, “abandoned the Kurds” during their fight against ISIS.
  • Rosenberg adds that many evangelicals are concerned about the precedent set by Trump’s decision to turn his back on a Middle East ally. “People are asking themselves, ‘Could he also turn his back on other allies in the future?’ Of course, most people when they ask that question are thinking about Israel.”
    Rosenberg tells Haaretz that the evangelical leaders’ calls for Trump to change course were “enormously significant” for another reason. “One criticism that evangelicals have constantly faced in the Trump era is that they’re so close to Trump and are [rarely] willing to contradict him or call him out. There are very good reasons for evangelicals who care about Israel to strongly support President Trump, but you can clearly see, based on the events of this week, that some evangelical leaders are also willing to criticize the president if they disagree with his policies.”….
  • Rosenberg, however, warns about taking the evangelical vote for granted. “The risk for President Trump isn’t that evangelicals will turn against him,” he says. “The risk is that a small percentage of the evangelicals who voted for him in 2016 will stay home next November [2020] if they’re not happy about what’s going on in the country and the world.
  • “If evangelical turnout goes down by even 1 percent,” he continues, “that could be enough to have an impact in key battleground states. We have more than a year until the election, and no one can say what will happen until then. But it would be good for the president to listen to those who are urging him to reconsider this policy.”

Please pray:
• For the protection and freedom of the Kurds

• For the safety and boldness of the many Christians in northern Syria

• For wisdom for the President and all US and regional leaders to know how best to handle the situation

• For Erdogan and other enemies that they would change their course and Christ would change their hearts.

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Why don’t all Christians have God’s love for both Israelis and Arabs, and why are too many ashamed to share the Gospel with us? This was what I discussed at Dr. John Piper’s seminary this week. (Here’s the video of the chapel service.)

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(Minneapolis, Minnesota) — For the last several days, I have been in the Twin Cities, speaking at four events at Bethlehem College & Seminary. The school was founded by Dr. John Piper, the internationally renowned Evangelical pastor, theologian and author, and a man who has had a profound impact on my spiritual life, though until we had a lovely dinner this week we had never met.

On Wednesday morning — Yom Kippur, as it happened, the Day of Atonement for the world’s 17 million Jews — I was asked to preach at chapel (to watch the full message, please click here). I chose for my text Romans 1:14-17, in which the Apostle Paul wrote, “I am not ashamed of the Gospel for it it the power of God for salvation for everyone who believes, to the Jew first, and also to the Greeks (Gentiles).”

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In this critically important yet far-too-seldom-preached passage, Paul calls the Church to be loving yet bold in making sure that every Jewish person and every non-Jewish person in the world has the opportunity to hear the Gospel message in its entirety and to make an informed decision to receive or reject Jesus as Messiah and Savior.

Paul, as we know, was severely persecuted for being so passionate about telling all people the good news of Jesus, but what I love about him was that he was neither ashamed nor afraid.

Sadly, not all Evangelicals share Paul’s passion. And in my message — which begins far more emotionally than I’d expected or intended — I explain why.

I hope you’ll watch the entire sermon — which runs about 31 minutes, and share it with others. Thanks, and God bless you.

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(Photos: 1) chapel service screenshot; 2) Dr. John Piper and his wife, Noel; 3) me and my friend of 23 years, Rick Segal, who serves as VP for Advancement at Bethlehem.)

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Today is Yom Kippur. But how can Jews receive atonement without a Temple in Jerusalem and the sacrifice of a perfect lamb? A few thoughts from the Hebrew prophets.

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(Minneapolis, Minnesota) — Greetings from the beautiful city of Minneapolis. I am here speaking for several days at Bethlehem College and Seminary — founded by Dr. John Piper, the internationally-renowned Evangelical pastor and theologian — on what the Bible teaches about God’s great love for Jews and Arabs, and what the Church’s responsibilities are in loving them, as well.

It’s a particular interesting time of the year to discuss this topic because at sundown, some 17 million Jews — in Israel and around the world — will observe “Yom Kippur,” the “Day of Atonement.” This is a 24-hour period of complete fasting and prayer, in which Jews will ask God and others to forgive and cleanse them from the sins they have committed in this previous year. They will also pray that their names will be “written and sealed” in the “Book of Life” so they can spend eternity with God in heaven, and not be sent to hell.

Yet there is a serious problem facing our community.

How exactly can Jewish people receive forgiveness from God without a Temple in Jerusalem? How can we receive atonement when there is no place where we can make the blood sacrifice of a perfect, unblemished lamb that God requires for atonement?

In the Torah — notably in Leviticus 17:11 — the Lord is crystal clear: “For the life of the flesh is in the blood, and I have given it to you on the altar to make atonement for your souls; for it is the blood by reason of the life that makes atonement.”

Elsewhere in Scripture, this point is made yet again: “without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness.” (Hebrews 9:22)

Yet since 70 AD, we Jews have had no Temple in Jerusalem. For almost 2,000 years therefore we have had no place to make proper, acceptable sacrifices. Therefore, we haven’t been able to put our trust in the shedding of the blood of an innocent perfect lamb. That’s very serious. It means that according to the Law of Moses, we cannot receive atonement of our sins, even on the Day of Atonement.

Where, then, does that leave us?

The Hebrew prophets Jeremiah, Daniel and Isaiah point to the answer:

  1. The Hebrew prophet Jeremiah tells us that the Lord will one day introduce to the Jewish people a “new covenant” — very different from the covenant He made with Moses — and through this new covenant the Lord says, “I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.” (see Jeremiah 31:31-34)
  2. The Hebrew prophet Daniel sheds light on how the new covenant will work. Through Daniel, the Lord tells us that the “Anointed One” — the Messiah — will come one day “to atone for wickedness, to bring in everlasting righteousness.” Daniel tells us that when the Messiah comes to bring atonement that He will be “cut off” — something terrible happens to him — and that all this will happen before the Temple and Jerusalem are destroyed. In other words, Daniel makes it clear that after the Messiah comes to bring atonement the Temple won’t be needed, but that the Lord won’t allow the Temple to be destroyed before the Messiah comes. The Romans, of course, destroyed the Second Temple and the City of Jerusalem in 70 AD. Thus, according to Daniel, the Messiah had to come before 70 AD. (see Daniel 9:21-27)
  3. The Hebrew prophet Isaiah then tells us something truly extraordinary: after the Anointed One comes, we Jewish people will look back at Him and say, “he (the Messiah) took up our pain and bore our suffering, yet we considered him punished by God, stricken by him, and afflicted. But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was on Him, and by his wounds we are healed. We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each of us has turned to our own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all….he bore the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.” (see Isaiah 53)

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In 1973, after carefully studying the Hebrew prophets and the New Testament Gospel According to Luke, my Orthodox Jewish father came to the conclusion that Jesus of Nazareth is the Messiah for which we Jews have waited. My father realized that he could only receive forgiveness and atonement and have his name written in the Book of Life by placing his faith in the death and resurrection of Jesus, so that’s what he did. (To watch him briefly share his story, please click here.)

Several years later, I came to the same conclusion and placed my faith in Jesus the Messiah. (To watch me share my story, please click here.) 

That said, don’t take our word for it. If you are Jewish, I hope you’ll look up these Scriptures, study and consider them for yourself, and come to your own conclusion.

If you’re not Jewish, perhaps you’ll take a moment to share this with someone who is, as well as pray for all Jewish people to find the atonement that can only come through the new covenant.

Thanks so much. Gmar Chatimah Tovah! “May your name be written and sealed in the Book of Life!”

It is time for U.S. Senators to take a stand with Saudi Arabia against Iran. Here’s why. (My new op-Ed for FoxNews.com)

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(Quebec, Canada) — This morning, Fox News Opinion published my new column. The following are excerpts. Here is a link to the full column.

  • For too long, U.S. senators have hesitated to stand with Saudi Arabia, a long-time American ally and vital energy supplier to our allies in Europe and Asia. But as the Iranian regime shows its power, it’s time to pick a side….
  • In a “60 Minutes” interview on CBS Sunday, MBS said he had no prior knowledge of Khashoggi’s murder and no personal involvement. But he said he takes “full responsibility as a leader in Saudi Arabia, especially since it was committed by individuals working for the Saudi government.”….
  • Apart from Khashoggi, the recent cruise missile and drone attacks against oil facilities in Saudi Arabia briefly cut Saudi Aramco oil production by half, caused global oil prices to spike, and pushed the region to the brink of a new and dangerous military confrontation.
  • The attacks also raised two critical questions for members of the U.S. Senate.
  • First, with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo blaming Iran for the attacks, is it not true that U.S. national security interests necessitate standing firmly with the Saudis – along with Israel and our other Sunni Arab allies – to both counter and neutralize the rapidly rising Iranian threat?
  • Second, does not standing with Saudi Arabia involve re-engaging with MBS, even after the most complicated year in U.S.-Saudi relations since 2001?….
  • Far too many senators backed President Obama’s Iran nuclear deal that gave upwards of $150 billion to the mullahs in Tehran. Even now, some senators continue clinging to the vain hope that Iran’s leaders want to rejoin the civilized world of peaceful nations.
  • Still other senators have let their anger at MBS tempt them to jettison the longstanding and important alliance with Riyadh despite the kingdom’s vital role in counterterrorism and its role as the supplier of the oil to the world at…..

To read the full column, please click here.

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UPDATED: I’llspeak soon in Dallas, Minneapolis & Orange County. Here are the details. Please join us. I hope to see you.

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UPDATED (Quebec, Canada) — Greetings from chilly Quebec! Lynn and I are just finishing up a wonderful Joshua Fund Cruise of New England and Canada where I’ve been teaching all week on God’s love for Israel and our Arab neighbors, Bible prophecy and the geopolitics of the region. Some 200 guests plus board members and TJF staff came with us. I so wish you were with us, but more on that later. And maybe we’ll do this again.

For now, I wanted to update you on the places where I’ll be speaking in the States over the next two weeks. Please make plans to join us at one or more of these events. I’d love to see you.

  • Sunday, October 6th: Dallas, Texas Speaking at First Baptist Dallas at all morning services.
  • Sunday, October 6th: Dallas, Texas Speaking at First Baptist Dallas at evening Q&A event (5:30-7pm)
  • Tuesday, October 8th: Minneapolis, Minnesota — Speaking at Bethlehem College & Seminary (founded by Dr. John Piper) at two events: a Writer’s Workshop (5-7pm, register here) and an evening lecture and Q&A (open to the public from 7-9pm, register here).
  • Wednesday, October 9th: Minneapolis, Minnesota — Speaking at Bethlehem College & Seminary Chapel (Noon, open to the public).
  • Sunday, October 13th: Orange County, California — Speaking at Greg Laurie’s Harvest Church (all morning services).
  • Saturday, October 19th: Minneapolis, Minnesota — Speaking at Rock Point Church and doing an evening of Q&A. (NOW SOLD OUT/NO WALK-INs — sorry)
  • Sunday, October 20th: Minneapolis, Minnesota — Speaking at Rock Point Church (all morning services).

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A candid conversation about war, peace, reform, MBS and faith in Jesus. My front-page interview with the Saudi Gazette.

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In both their Arabic and English editions, the Saudi Gazette has just published a rare and possibly unprecedented front-page interview with an Evangelical Christian speaking candidly about war, peace, reform, the Crown Prince and what followers of Jesus believe. 

To read the full interview, please click here. 

JEDDAH — Crown Prince Muhammad Bin Salman is leading Saudi Arabia through the most dramatic, positive and exciting social and economic reforms in the history of the Kingdom, said Joel C. Rosenberg, New York Times best-selling author and head of the Evangelical Delegation, in an exclusive interview with Saudi Gazette, following his visit to the Kingdom recently…..

Rosenberg: None of us want to see another war in the Middle East. As followers of Jesus Christ, we are commanded in the Bible to pray for peace and to be peacemakers. So, we are praying fervently for peace and stability. At the same time, however, we regard the Iranian regime as sheer evil, determined to export their Revolution of death and destruction in a wicked scheme to establish a global Caliphate….

Rosenberg: As a follower of Jesus Christ, I am commanded in the Bible to love my neighbor and pray for my neighbors. That’s why I accepted the Crown Prince’s invitation to come last year and again this year, despite the criticism against the Kingdom. Saudi Arabia is my neighbor. I want the best for the people and leaders of this Kingdom. Yes, I see the problems. I’m not blind to the mistakes, nor to the criticisms. But I also see real progress. And I want to commend the Kingdom for all the good reforms they are making, even while respectfully urging you to make even bolder reforms. Religious leaders who are paralyzed by cynicism and are constantly critical are not helpful. If we want to see positive change, we need to praise what is good and build honest and sincere friendships in which we can talk openly and candidly about what is not good….

Rosenberg: Few Saudis know much about Evangelical Christianity. I hope they will learn more about us over time. There are more than 60 million Evangelicals in the United States, and more than 600 million worldwide.

Evangelicals believe in the teachings of the whole Bible, both the Old and New Testaments. We believe that Jesus is the Messiah. We also believe He is God and that He loves all people and wants every person in the world to know and follow Him.

The Bible teaches Christians to share the love of Jesus Christ with everyone in the whole world, and to encourage them to read the Bible for themselves. The most famous verse in the Bible is found in the Book of John, chapter three, verse 16. It reads, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, and whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have everlasting life.”

We love that verse, and we live by it. But we are never supposed to force our religion on anyone. Some people have done this in the past, claiming to be Christians. This grieves me, but I can tell you they were not following the model or teachings of Jesus found in the New Testament.

I think there is much we as Evangelicals can learn from the people of Saudi Arabia. And I think that after the Crown Prince invited us twice to the Kingdom there is growing curiosity among Saudis about us and why we seek to be ambassadors of peace and reconciliation….

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No national unity government in Israel — yet. Talks break down. Netanyahu given first opportunity to form government coalition.

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(New York, New York) — We have breaking news out of Israel.

After two days of discussions between Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, Prime Minister Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu and Blue & White leader Benny Gantz, negotiations have broken down.

No agreement was made to create a national unity government — even though that’s what almost everyone in Israel wants.

Therefore, Rivlin has decided to give Netanyahu the first opportunity to form a coalition government because 55 members of Knesset (Israel’s Parliament) told Rivlin they want Bibi to be the PM again.

Only 54 members supported Gantz.

Netanyahu now has 28 days to try to form a government. If necessary, he can ask Rivlin for up to an additional 14 days.

If Bibi cannot form a government, however, Rivlin will give Gantz the opportunity to try. If it gets to that point, Gantz will also have 28 days. He may also then have a great deal of leverage to persuade Bibi and Likud to create a national unity government after all.

Bottom line: keep praying for us — we very well may not have a fully-formed new government until late November.

NOTE: These are my own personal views. I’m not writing or speaking in my capacity as Founder and Chairman of The Joshua Fund, as that organization is non-political and non-partisan.

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How should Trump & the Saudis respond to Iran’s “act of war”? And how serious are they about restoring deterrence? I discussed all this with i24 TV News. Here’s the interview.

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(Washington, DC) — Just before I left for Washington, I did a live interview with i24 TV News from Jerusalem on the escalating tensions in the Gulf and what may come next.

Among the questions that anchors Nurit Ben and Calev Ben-David asked me:

  • With Secretary Pompeo calling Iran’s attack on Saudi oil facilities an “act of war,” how closely aligned do you think the White House’s views are with the Saudis’ views?
  • With President Trump facing elections in 2020, isn’t he going to be reluctant to start a new war in the Middle East — and can’t the Saudis simply defend themselves without US help?
  • How can the US and the Saudis restore deterrence against Iran? Is there any way other than military action to achieve deterrence? Aren’t leaders in the region growing concerned that President Trump might not have their back if a real war erupts?
  • Shouldn’t the Saudis turn to Israel to buy for missile defense systems to protect their Kingdom? Yet, wouldn’t that require peace between Riyadh and Jerusalem? Are the Saudis trending towards real peace and cooperation with Israel?

Important questions all.

Click here to watch my answers — the interview runs a bit over 6 minutes.

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OTHER RECENT COVERAGE:

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Will Israelis be forced to an unprecedented 3rd round of elections? I discussed this — and Netanyahu’s looming indictment hearing next week — with CBN NEWS.

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(Washington, DC) — This week I’m in Washington briefing White House officials, Members of Congress and Middle East experts at various think tanks on our recent meetings in Saudi Arabia with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and his inner circle.

Yet as interesting as all those conversations are, people keep asking me about last week’s elections in Israel and where things are headed.

  • Can Netanyahu form a government when fewer people voted for him and allies than in April?
  • Will Netanyahu actually be indicted after next week’s hearings?
  • Does Benny Gantz really have a shot at being the next Prime Minister, and will it be a “national unity government”?
  • Why did Israel’s Arab parties — which haven’t supported a Jewish candidate for PM since Yitzhak Rabin in the early 1990s — suddenly decide to support Gantz, a former IDF chief of staff?
  • And is it really possible Israel will remain deadlocked and we’ll have to go to an unprecedented third round of elections?

Yesterday, I discussed all these matters — as well as the blowback I’m getting from meeting with MBS — with CBN News anchors John Jessup and Jenna Browder on their program, “Faith Nation.” Hope you’ll watch and tell me your thoughts on Twitter and/or my “Epicenter Team” page on Facebook.

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NOTE: These are my own personal views. I’m not writing or speaking in my capacity as Founder and Chairman of The Joshua Fund, as that organization is non-political and non-partisan.

MORE RECENT TV INTERVIEWS

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Netanyahu fails to win enough seats for right-wing coalition. National unity government most likely outcome after Israeli elections, but many twists and turns ahead. Here’s the latest.

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UPDATE: Here’s the column that I wrote for Fox News Opinion, an expanded and updated version of this blog.

(Jerusalem, Israel) — Israel is the only true democracy in the Middle East. And we love elections so much we’ve had two in the last six months.

But Tuesday’s vote didn’t go well for Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu, currently the longest-serving Prime Minister in Israeli history. After pulling out all the stops to secure 61 or more seats to build a right-wing coalition government, Bibi fell well short. 

In fact, his main rival, Benny Gantz, founder of the Blue & White party, won more seats (33) than Bibi’s Likud party (31). Gantz previously served as a highly-decorated chief of staff of the Israeli Defense Forces.

Israeli politics are cutthroat and labyrinthian, so there’s no point in going through all the possible permutations of what happens from here.

Short version: the most likely outcome is now a “national unity government” in which either Gantz serves as Prime Minister for the first two years and Netanyahu for the second two years, or vice versa. 

That said, here’s what you need to know:

  • Netanyahu faces an all-important court hearing on October 2, and it is very possible that he will be formally indicted in three separate corruption cases. Though Bibi deserves the presumption of innocence, many Israelis believe government officials should not forge a deal with Bibi because he will need to spend so much of his time on his own legal defense in the years ahead.
  • Gantz and his Blue & White co-leaders say they want to a form a “broad… national unity goverment.” They’re happy to form one with Likud, they say, but only if someone else leads Likud. They don’t want to make a deal with Bibi because he’s facing indictments
  • Avigdor Liberman — the former Defense Minister, head of his own political party, and former chief of staff for Netanyahu who is a now a fierce rival of Netanyahu — won 9 seats. This is nearly double from his previous 5 seats, and Liberman is widely regarded as the “kingmaker” whose support is crucial to anyone trying to create a majority coalition. Liberman today indicated that he will recommend Gantz, not Netanyahu — to be next Prime Minister, though he, too, supports a national unity government. 
  • If all this weren’t complicated enough, neither Blue & White nor Liberman’s party are keen on having ultra-Orthodox religious parties in the coalition, believing those parties already exert too much control over Israeli social policy and the budget. Will Likud be willing to join a national unity government only with Blue & White and Liberman, jettisoning their long-time alliance with the religious parties? That remains to be seen, and is likely going to be a major point of contention in the negotiations.

I’ll post more analysis in the days ahead, but for breaking news please follow me on Twitter @JoelCRosenberg.

(Photo: PM Netanyahu on the left, Israeli President Reuven Rivlin in the center, and Benny Gantz on the right, shaking hands at an event today remembering the late-President of Israel Shimon Peres.)

NOTE: These are my own personal views. I’m not writing in my capacity as Founder and Chairman of The Joshua Fund, as that organization is non-political and non-partisan.

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